Thursday, September 27, 2012

An Interactive Cloud Made of 6,000 Light Bulbs

CLOUD is a large scale interactive installation by artist Caitlind r.c. Brown that appeared September 15th as part of Nuit Blanche Calgary in Alberta, Canada. The piece is made from 1,000 working lightbulbs on pullchains and an additional 5,000 made from donated burnt out lights donated by the public. Visitors to the installation could pull the chains causing the cloud to sort of shimmer and flicker, I can’t tell you how much I would have enjoyed seeing this up close or at least on video. Did anyone film it? Learn more about it on the project website, and if you liked this also check out Wang Yuyang’s Artificial Moon. (viamy eclectic depiction of life)

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Bonsai Tree Houses by Takanori Aiba

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here. (via design you trust)

Animal Sculptures Made from Shattered CDs

In his mixed media sculptures of animals and insects artist Sean Avery creates fur and feathers using meticulously layered fragments of broken CDs. Love the colors. See more over on DeviantArt. (via keep your mind wide open)

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

This is What Happens When You Give Thousands of Stickers to Thousands of Kids

This December, in a surprisingly simple yet ridiculously amazing installation for theQueensland Gallery of Modern Ar, artist Yayoi Kusama constructed a large domestic environment, painting every wall, chair, table, piano, and household decoration a brilliant white, effectively serving as a giant white canvas. Over the course of two weeks, the museum’s smallest visitors were given thousands upon thousands of colored dot stickers and were invited to collaborate in the transformation of the space, turning the house into a vibrantly mottled explosion of color. How great is this? Given the opportunity my son could probably cover the entire piano alone in about fifteen minutes. The installation, entitled The Obliteration Room, is part of Kusama’s Look Now, See Forever exhibition that runs through March 12.

Origami Masks and Tessellations by Joel Cooper

Paper artist Joel Cooper folds these astounding masks and tessellations from single pieces of paper. Given the right conditions I might be expected to fold a piece of paper in half, and on a good day even into fourths, but I simply can’t fathom the patience and understanding required to transform paper into three-dimensional objects like this. You can see more of his work here and some of the pieces seen here are available on Etsy.

Illustrated Skulls by Meyoko

 Anacridium No. 1

Alaus Oculatus
Ecuadorian illustrator Melissa Murillo (aka Meyoko) lives and works in Berlin where she draws some of the most fantastically intricate images I’ve encountered in some time. These two skulls utilizing the abstracted anatomy of insects are by far my favorite, but my guess is many of you will thoroughly enjoy the rest of her portfolio. These two particular pieces are available as limited edition giclee prints in her shop, and you can see her work later this year at Illustrative in Berlin.

Watercolor Paintings by Agnes Cecile

I’m really enjoying these watercolor paintings by Agnes Cecile. Check out her shop for a number of original original works. (via wicked game)

Flying People in New York City

How fun is this? The marketing team behind the movie Chronicle built three RC planes in the shape of human beings and flew them around New York City to create the illusion of superheroes zooming around iconic landmarks. Say what you will about this being a viral marketing ploy, I would much rather watch this than a 60-second trailer on TV. Well done. And also, I want one. (via gizmodo)


 from the outside lauren and patrick godfrey’s san francisco home looks like the rest of the charming victorians in ashbury heights. but once inside, you’re surprised by this gorgeous modernized loft-like home with floor to ceiling windows exposing the whole house to some of the city’s best views. both lauren and patrick work in a creative capacity which may explain their excellent taste — lauren is a creative director at r/ga, and patrick is managing partner, president at godfrey q and partners. their home is filled with an amazing art collection — lauren and partick like to give each other artwork as gifts — and one of a kind pieces that make it completely unique and beautifully eclectic. here’s a look.

 photos by helynn ospina and victoria smith.


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